12
Mar

2015

Photo of the Week: Teleférico Cristo de la Concordia (Cochabamba, Bolivia)

Post by Nick Chu

Cochabamba 1

Photographer:
Photo by Andrew Alfred-Duggan.

About:
The teleférico (cable car) connects to the Cristo de la Concordia in Cochabamba, Bolivia. The statue is apparently bigger than the more famous Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro. The site is also accessible via a long trek up the mountain side.

Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.

10
Mar

2015

Onboard the Bursa Teleferik (Bursa Gondola)

Post by Nick Chu

Ever wanted to hop onboard the Bursa Teleferik, aka the world’s longest monocable gondola, but a plane ride to Turkey seemed a little far (and not to mention a bit pricey)?

Thanks to Youtube user Marios Kordellas, you can now take a virtual trip and enjoy a relaxing ride from the city of Bursa to Uludağ mountain.

In just 22 minutes, you’ll get to experience how it feels to travel through the first two sections of the cable car from Teferrüç station (city) to Sarıalan station (Uludağ).

The third section, which was reported to have opened at the end of last year, unfortunately was not captured.

In any event, the ride is available in HD so you might want to adjust the video quality to 1020p before you start your journey!

06
Mar

2015

Weekly Roundup: Agreement Signed for 6 More Urban Cable Cars in La Paz-El Alto

Post by Nick Chu



A quick look at some of the things that happened this week in the world of urban gondolas, cable cars and cable propelled transit:

La Paz (Bolivia)
The delivery of a funicular connecting 17 de Obrajes station on the Linea Verde (Green Line) marks the completion of La Paz’s Phase 1 cable car plans. And without wasting anytime, Phase 2 agreements have been signed between the government and Doppelmayr for 6 more urban gondola systems! The total investment will be USD$450 million and the cable cars are scheduled to open by 2020.

Jerusalem Cable Car (Israel)
Reports indicate that government authorities will soon reveal their plans for a cable car connecting Jerusalem’s Old City. The $31 million system is meant to provide improved transport to the city’s 3 million tourists.

14th year anniversary (El Paso, Texas)
The Wyler Aerial Tramway in Franklin Mountain State park is set to celebrate its 14th birthday since it re-opened in 2001. The original system first began operations in 1960 and operated until 1986. Festivities will be held on Saturday from 12:00pm – 5:00pm

Utica Proposals (Utica, New York)
A concept for an urban gondola connecting Harbor Point to the city’s downtown has been raised by councillor Ed Bucciero. The councillor is pushing to have the idea considered by local officials for a more thorough analysis and discussion.

05
Mar

2015

Photo of the Week: Teleférico da Providência (Providência Cable Car)

Post by Nick Chu

Image by Flickr user Ninja Media (creative commons).

Photographer:
Photo by Flickr user Ninja Media.

About:
The Teleférico da Providência is a 3 station, 721m urban cable car located in one of Brazil’s first favelas, Morro da Providência, in Rio de Janeiro. It was built as part of a community revitalization program and opened for service in July 2014.

Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.

04
Mar

2015

Are We At Peak Giant Ferris Wheel?

Post by Steven Dale

Ferris Wheel Cable Car

If every city has one of these, what’s the value of one of these?

A few years back it seemed every city and its brother wanted to build a giant ferris wheel.

Inspired by successful projects like the London Eye, cities across the world have been lining up to build these now-ubiquitous amusement rides to such an extent, The Atlantic’s Citylab posited the question: What happens when every city has a giant ferris wheel?

It’s a good question.

As more and more cities build these moving observation platforms, will their attraction value decrease? Will we see more of these systems fall into receivership, such as the  Singapore Flyer or the Wheel of Brisbane? Or will investment continue apace?

My guess is that you’ll see a combination of scenarios.

Giant Ferris Wheels are clearly experiencing a trend—and like all trends, there will be three groups of investors trying to capitalize on it.

Firstly, there will be the first movers who can capitalize upon the prime markets of the world and establish themselves as market leaders. Think the London Eye, the Las Vegas High Roller and Staten Island’s New York Wheel.

There will be second movers who capitalize upon mid-tier markets who realize a nice profit but nothing compared to what the movers in markets like London and Las Vegas experience.

And lastly there will be a fair share of bandwagon jumpers more interested in riding the wave instead of understanding the wave. These people will build in whatever market is available to them and will likely find themselves holding onto a large piece of metal that has almost no chance of return on investment.

Why is that? Simple—tourists get bored easily. The tourist class are always on the hunt for the new, the unique, and the authentic. And if we accept that assumption as true, then for every additional ferris wheel that’s built, the less enticing every other ferris wheel on the planet becomes. That’s how trends work. The more you see of it, the less you want it.

I, like millions of others, would be more than happy to drop a few pounds on the London Eye. The Singapore Flyer? Not so much. Why? Because the London Eye was first. It was the original. It’s iconic. The Singapore Flyer is an also-ran and a copycat. Is that logical? Not even remotely, and that’s the point—logic doesn’t fit into the equation here.

Witness the world-record setting High Roller ferris wheel in Las Vegas. It is an original and is about as sure a bet as one can find in this gambling mecca. But did you know about that other ferris wheel? The Skyvue? The one that’s also located in Las Vegas?

Yeah, that one stopped construction a couple of years back and, if reports are to be believed, is dead on arrival. That didn’t stop a third consortia, however, from proposing a third ferris wheel for Las Vegas despite having virtually no chance of ever getting the necessary permits.

Why?

Because no city requires three ferris wheels because no tourist cares about three ferris wheels. No city requires two. In fact, most large geographic regions barely require one.

Once you’ve seen one ferris wheel, you’ve kind of seen them all. Sure the view is a bit different in each one, but only to a limited extent. That thrill wears off rather quick and only the most iconic of systems with the most iconic of views will be profitable in the long term.

So how does that relate to cable cars, you might ask?

We’ll deal with that question next week.

03
Mar

2015

Brest Cable Car (Téléphérique de Brest)

Post by Nick Chu

Scheduled to open in Summer 2016, the Brest Cable Car (Téléphérique de Brest) will be France’s first urban cable car.

Originally designed as a Funitel, the system will use an Aerial Tram configuration and will employ some very special design techniques to minimize station size and cost. Can anyone spot what this is? ;)

28
Feb

2015

Weekly Roundup: Urban Cable Car Tenders Released in Caribbean’s Largest City

Post by Nick Chu

Santo Domingo Skyline. Image from Wikipedia.

A quick look at some of the things that happened this week in the world of urban gondolas, cable cars and cable propelled transit:

Metrocable Announced in Caribbean (Santo Domingo)
Santo Domingo, the capital of Dominican Republic, has reportedly released tenders for a 5km, 4 station CPT line. This urban cable car will connect to the city’s Metro network and serve the residents living near the Ozama river. Once construction starts, officials estimate that the cable lift can be completed in 14 months.

Myanmar’s First Cable Car (Myanmar)
Progress is being made for what could be Myanmar’s first cable car. The proposed $20 million system links Mount Kyaiktiyo and a Buddhist pilgrimage site. This project is being spearheaded by the joint venture, SkyAsia, after it secured a 50 year build-operate-transfer contract from the government. Access to the top is currently limited to a ride on pickup trucks or a 4 hour hike.

Palm Springs Zip Line (California)
A proposal for a 550-foot zip line at the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway has sparked environmental concerns from several local groups.  They question how noise and additional traffic generated by this new attraction will impact animal species, particularly the bighorn sheep. Tramway officials say that they will work closely with the city and local groups to develop the appropriate solutions.

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