14
May

2015

Photo of the Week: Medellin Linea K

Post by Nick Chu

Medellin Linea K. Image by Flickr user Alcaldía de Medellín.

Photographer:
Photo by Flickr user Alcaldía de Medellín.

About:
It’s hard believe that Medellin, Colombia’s Metrocable Linea K is already over 10 years old. The instant success of this gondola system has arguably been the catalyst and inspiration for almost all of South America’s other urban cable cars. The ways it has improved and touched the lives of its barrio residents continue to make it a highly revered and respected piece of transport infrastructure for all city builders.

Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.

13
May

2015

Symphony: Sports Car Inspired 3S Cabin

Post by Nick Chu

Symphony 3S Cabins by LEITNER Ropeways.

LEITNER Ropeways has teamed up with Pininfarina, designers of the Ferrari and Maserati to create the Symphony 3S cabin. This new gondola carrier offers unparalleled comfort and experience for passengers in both urban and mountain environments.

Innovative designs such as sophisticated interior illumination, new climate control systems, and wide-glass panoramic windows are just a handful of the many features now available in the Symphony cabin. To learn more, click here.

12
May

2015

Green Line Opens, Phase 1 Complete

Post by Nick Chu

Green Line. Image by Doppelmayr.

With the opening of the Green Line in La Paz-El Alto, Bolivia last December, it officially marked the completion of phase 1 in the city’s aerial transport revolution. The three urban cable cars, Red Line, Yellow Line and Green Line have surpassed all expectations.

To find out more about the project click here.

11
May

2015

System Dossier: Portland Aerial Tram

Post by Nick Chu

Portland Aerial Tram. Image by Flickr user Dougtone.

The Portland Aerial Tram is one of the best-designed CPT systems in the world.

Its shiny, metallic, pill-shaped cabins float gracefully across the Rose City skyline, transporting medical staff, patients and sightseers from the South Waterfront district to the Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) atop Marquam Hill.

The 1km aerial journey takes less than 4 minutes, saving commuters from the hassle and inconvenience of a circuitous bus route. OHSU personnel and transit pass holders ride free but a round-trip ticket for sightseers seeking sky-high views is a very affordable $4.35.

Its jigback cable system has won many design awards, but also caused more than its fair share of controversies, including signficant “scope creep”, privacy issues and, interestingly, aesthetics. (Such is the reality of urban design. One person’s “award-winning vision” is another’s “ugly”.) These days, those initial challenges are largely forgotten and residents beneath the CPT co-exist peacefully with it. In fact, many home sellers tout their property’s “prime location next to an aerial transit line”.

The lower Tram station is a great example of a multi-modal transit hub, with great access to streetcars, buses and bike racks. This precedent-setting level of integration has contributed to its success and more than ~1.4 million passengers ride the system each year.


Length (km) 1.0
Stations 2
Year Opened 2007
Capacity 980
Ridership (yearly) ~1,400,000
Trip Time 3-4 minutes
Maximum Speed (m/s) 10
08
May

2015

Weekly Roundup: Kenya’s Second Largest City Plans Water Crossing Cable Car

Post by Steven Dale

Likoni Ferry. Image by Flickr user Greg McMullin.

A quick look at some of the things that happened this week in the world of urban gondolas, cable cars and cable propelled transit:

Likoni Cable Car (Mombasa, Kenya)
Plans for an aerial cable system crossing Killindini Harbour from Likoni to Mombasa ‘surfaced’ this week. With its transport capacity of 5,500 pphpd, the cable car is proposed as a complement to the existing Likoni Ferry. The system will cost USD$41 million and construction is expected to begin in September 2015.

Maintenance Continues on Ngong Ping 360 (Hong Kong, China)
The Ngong Ping 360 remains closed until May 12 for annual maintenance. So far, inspections have revealed surface wear on a section of track rope near Tower 5. In the meantime, other attractions, like the Ngong Ping Village and “Walking with Buddha”, remain open.

Buffalo Skyline (Buffalo, NY, USA)
A gondola proposal to link Buffalo’s downtown waterfront to the Outer Harbour is beginning to gain momentum. An information session is scheduled for May 18 where Gondola Project’s very own Nicholas Chu will give an overview of Cable Propelled Transit. Click here for more details.

07
May

2015

Photo of the Week: Yoshino Ropeway (吉野ロープウェイ)

Post by Nick Chu

Yoshino Ropeway. Image by Flickr user Kzaral.

Photographer:
Photo by Flickr user Kzaral.

About:
Built in 1929, the Yoshino Ropeway is believed to be Japan’s oldest surviving cable system. Connecting to Mount Yoshino, it functions as an aerial transport link for sightseers as well as nearby residents. The system is only 349m in length and each cabin holds 28 passengers. In 2013, the cabins were updated with a new coat of paint which features a “Sakura” design with cherry blossoms and maples.

Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.

06
May

2015

Transported or Transmuted? The Other Side of Marketing Public Transit

Post by Steven Bochenek

Despite the many benefits of transit, it often does a poor job marketing itself. Image by Flickr user Todd Anderson.

Last week I talked here about the need to rethink public transit. This week, we return to the subject but from a different perspective. As a lifelong writer of advertising and marketing materials, I’ve always been interested in how people and industries are marketed (aka presented in the media). Advertising people like me are typically self-loathing lunatics and inveterate drunks. But we get off easy compared to public transit passengers. They’re usually sad little people with no power to change their lives. Last week I even mentioned the Italian word for commuter, pendolare or pendulum, which captures the powerlessness of someone being swung back and forth. In Britain, enthusiasts of public transit are called train spotters and, again, portrayed at best as lonely, creepy or just dangerous.

Of course, what do you expect when you see how horribly public transit itself is often portrayed? Let’s review a few examples.

Read more

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