19
Jan

2015

Cablegraph: People-Moving Comparison

Post by Gondola Project

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Like most people, we love infographics. But we really enjoy a good visual breakdown of transit capabilities, such as this collection of images from around the world. So when we came across the above graphic on Doppelmayr’s Facebook page, we thought it would be worth sharing.



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16
Jan

2015

Weekly Roundup: New York Times Hearts Squamish; Rough Guides Features Sapa; Kedarnath Ropeway Update

Post by Gondola Project

Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish, BC. Image by Flickr user Stephen Rees.

Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish, BC. Image by Flickr user Stephen Rees. (Creative commons.)

A quick look at some of the things that happened this week in the world of urban gondolas, cable cars and cable propelled transit:

If You Can Make It There… (Canada)
Squamish, B.C. made The New York Times’ list of must-visit places for 2015. Naturally, one of the main attractions highlighted by the Grey Lady is the city’s Sea to Sky gondola.

Longer! Higher! Easier! (Vietnam)
Also in tourism news, Rough Guides recently named the impending Sapa cable car to the peak of Mt. Fansipan in Vietnam’s Lao Cai Province as one of the Top 9 new tourist attractions to visit in 2015. The system, which is slated to open in September, will be the longest and highest in the world.

Ropeway Pilgrimage (India)
Despite earlier snags in the plan to link Kedarnath Temple with a last-mile ropeway, Uttarakhand Chief Minister Harish Rawat told a gathering of the Hoteliers Association that the project is a go. According to Hill Post, the 3.5 km ropeway would help provide access to the site, whose surrounding area was devastated by a flood in 2013.



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15
Jan

2015

Cable Car Photo of the Week: Shin-Kobe Ropeway

Post by Gondola Project

Shin Kobe Ropeway in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. Image by Flickr user Aapo Haapanen. (Creative commons.)

Shin Kobe Ropeway in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. Image by Flickr user Aapo Haapanen. (Creative commons.)

Photographer:
Photo by Flickr user Aapo Haapanen.

About:
Opened in 1991, this 1.5 km ropeway links downtown Kobe with the Nunobiki Herb Garden on Mount Rokkō.

Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

14
Jan

2015

Going… Across? The Future of Elevators is Here

Post by Chris Bilton

MULTI elevator. Image courtesy of ThyssenKrupp.

MULTI elevator. Image courtesy of ThyssenKrupp.

From mobile devices to urban planning, space is always at a premium. Ever-smaller devices like smartwatches are able to do infinitely more than the average home PC of a decade ago, while developers are stacking compacted living quarters higher and higher into the sky. Minuscule gadgetry has existed for centuries; the very idea of vertical living, however, has really only been with us for a little less than 100 years. And the (literal) rise of the skyscraper era is directly linked to the development of the modern elevator.

Outside of the go-anywhere elevator featured in the ending of the 1971 film Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, the basic idea of the elevator has remained more or less unchanged since it debuted. But whether glassed-in or high speed, they still only go up and down.

That is until late last year when German company ThyssenKrupp announced its MULTI elevator, which can go up and down as well as side to side. Instead of the traditional cables, the cabin is moved by magnetic force. (Bloomberg Businessweek has an excellent visual rendering of how it works.) Directional improvements aside, the new technology also means that cabins are considerably lighter and will be able to travel more efficiently through buildings. Accompanying the story was the staggering statistic that elevators take up 40 per cent of the space in an average condo tower. Read more



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12
Jan

2015

5 Amazing LEGO Cable Car Systems

Post by Chris Bilton

LEGO cable car. Image by Flickr user Pascal.

LEGO cable car. Image by Flickr user Pascal. (Creative commons.)

LEGO lovers have always known that the colourful toy bricks can be a (nubby) pathway to a future in architecture or urban design. Last month, The Guardian wrote an in-depth piece exploring just how useful LEGOs might be to actual life-sized city-building endeavours. We’re partial to seeing how people translate CPT technology into something that could carry those tiny smiling figures around a small-scale city or up to the peak of a plastic mountain. Here are a few of our favourite LEGO cable cars:

Detachable 3S — Kuppelbare Seilbahn
The detailed work here is nothing short of mind blowing—especially everything involved in moving the cabins around once they’re detached.


Read more



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09
Jan

2015

Weekly Roundup: Cable Car to Kyaiktiyo, Congestion Relief in Banff, and One Nymphomaniac

Post by Gondola Project

Kyaikhtiyo Pagoda in Myanmar.  (wikicommons)

Kyaikhtiyo Pagoda in Myanmar. (wikicommons)

A quick look at some of the things that happened this week in the world of cable cars, urban gondolas, and cable propelled transit:

Ascending to Golden Rock (Myanmar)
One of the country’s most famous destinations, the Kyaiktiyo Pagoda (also known as the Golden Rock), will soon be accessible by cable car. The Myanmar Investment Commisson has green-lit a joint venture called Sky Asia Co. Ltd. to link the Buddhist pilgrimage site to a nearby camp via cable.

Banff gondola vs. traffic congestion (Canada)
Alberta’s popular tourist town already has a gondola up to Sulphur Mountain. But now the city is looking to utilize cable-car technology in order to alleviate traffic congestion created by the area’s many sightseeing attractions.

Look up in the sky. It’s…art! (US)
We often talk about the aesthetic possibilities of both cable cars and stations when it comes to advertising and beautification. Now, Sun Valley Resort in Idaho is using its gondolas for something of an aerial art show. The ski resort recently debuted its “Art Car”—a cabin wrapped in images by local artist Ralph Harris.

Stranger than fiction (US)
While it’s not really about cable cars per se, an upcoming musical production in San Francisco called The Cable Car Nymphomaniac certainly has an intriguing title and a pretty bizarre back story. (Thankfully, Lars von Trier is not connected to the project in any way.)



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08
Jan

2015

Cable Car Photo of the Week: Sandia Peak Tramway

Post by Gondola Project

Sandia Peak Tramway in Albuquerque, NM. Image by Flickr user Lyn Caudle.

Sandia Peak Tramway in Albuquerque, NM. Image by Flickr user Lyn Caudle. (Creative commons.)

Photographer:
Photo by Flickr user Lyn Caudle (creative commons).

About:
For nearly 50 years, the Tram—as it’s called—has transported passengers from the edge of Albuquerque, New Mexico to the top of Sandia Mountains along 2.7 miles of cable.


Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

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