BUGA Systems.

25
Jan

2012

The Rostock/Munich Lift is on a Mountain

Remember the garden exhibition lift that first appeared in Rostock (IGA) in 2003 then was disassembled and reassembled in Munich (BUGA) in 2005?

Rostock 2003 / Munich 2005 gondola

Turns out, immediately following the BUGA show, the system was once again taken down and rebuilt … on a mountain. Yup, 40% of the system was re-used to construct the Imberg gondola lift at the Steibis ski resort in Bavarian Allgäu (southern Germany). And all in a matter of months — the dismantling starting in October and the system was in operation by mid-December of the same year.

The "new" 8-seater Imbergbahn MDG gondola

The Imberg gondola replaced a 54 year old chair lift.



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10
Feb

2011

The Rostock Gondola

A discussion in the comments of a recent post got me thinking about the Rostock gondola.

Built for the BUGA festival in 2003, it’s a system that’s mostly been forgotten and I have to assume the reason for this is that it no longer exists. It was designed and built as a temporary installation. The system was disassembled and then reassembled in Munich 2 years later for their BUGA festival. After which time it was disassembled and never heard from since.

As such, it’s pretty hard to find any information on it.

Nevertheless, rummaging through my archives, I found an old Doppelmayr promotional DVD of the Rostock system. I typically avoid posting promotional materials by either of the large manufacturers, but given the dearth of information out there, I thought I’d make an exception.

The music isn’t great and the video is certainly dated, but it’s well worth a look. There’s more than a couple unique things about the installation. See if you can spot them (the important stuff comes around the 1:50 mark):





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17
Apr

2010

More Urban Gondola Images

Image by Johannes Geisler, used with permissions.

Image by Johannes Geisler, used with permissions.

Image by the Doppelmayr Garaventa Group, used with permissions.

These images just landed in my inbox and I wanted to share them with everyone because I think they’re pretty special and inspiring. The first two are more from a series of renderings by Austrian design student, Johannes Geisler. You can see more of his designs here.

The final image is a new rendering of the Koblenz urban gondola system being opened for the BUGA horticultural show in Koblenz, Germany. That system should be operational any moment now. If you pay particular attention, you’ll notice something particularly important about this station: It’s an incredibly small, slim-profile station, ideal for the urban environment. Very exciting!

You can learn more about the Koblenz gondola, its unique design and BUGA here.



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BUGA Systems. / Oddities / Urban Planning & Design
Comments Off on More Urban Gondola Images
Comments Off on More Urban Gondola Images
28
Jan

2010

Test Drive A Cable System Today!

Take a look at that picture again . . . Now take a look at this one:

Looks like the same system, right? Well, you’re sort of right and sort of wrong.

It is, indeed, the same system, but they’re in two different cities!

For those who don’t know (and I certainly didn’t), the biannual Federal horticulture show in Germany (BUGA) is a big deal. The 2009 show in Schwerin welcomed 1.8 million visitors over 4 months and the 2011 show expects over 2 million visitors.

The two images above were from the 2003 BUGA in Rostock and the 2005 BUGA in Munich, respectively. To provide an aerial view of the show grounds, Doppelmayr installed a simple Monocable Detachable Gondola. At the end of the show in Rostock, the system was disassembled and reassembled in Munich.

How about doing the same thing for an urban transit system? A test drive, if you will.

Would it be a long system? Probably not, but it wouldn’t have to be. It would just have to make a point.

For example, the 2011 BUGA in Koblenz is building a short 850 m long system, but it will carry 7,000 passengers per hour, well in excess of most light rail lines in North America.

What looks to be a 3S system is being built for the 2011 BUGA in Koblenz, Germany.

The most exciting thing about the Koblenz system is that it is not the basic MDG used in Rostock and Munich. From the pictures I’ve seen, it appears to be a 3S, the most advanced aerial cable system on the planet. The 3S was popularized by Doppelmayr with their Peak-2-Peak at Whistler-Blackcomb and will receive significant attention during the upcoming winter games in Vancouver.

The big question is whether or not this will be a temporary installation. The stations are tiny compared to those in Whistler (a good thing for any urban environment), which suggests it is, but I can find no information to support or deny that assumption.

If it is a temporary installation, could it be toured? Could a city just try it out? Kick the tires a bit?

I often talk about the No City Wants to be First Problem. It’s a clear problem when it comes to purchasing transit infrastructure, but does the problem exist if extended to testing transit infrastructure? I’m not sure that it would.

I suspect a touring cable transit system would have no shortage of cities interested.

Who wants to be first?

Images from Dr. Alex Rollrasen, Allie Caulfield, and the Koblenz 2011 homepage.



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