02
Oct

2011

Sunday Statshot with Nick Chu: Science of Walking and Transit

Post by Nick Chu

 

Being a pedestrian in Toronto offers many advantages over driving: 1) It's a healthy form of exercise; and 2) Free entertainment from "Jesus Man" - a devotee responsible for more heart attacks than McDonalds and Burger King combined. Image by flickr user Metrix X.

A quick look at some of the things that make walking and riding transit work (or not):

Year when humans started walking: 1.5 million years ago

Year when walking became a sport: 19th century (1801-1900)

Year when most North Americans forgot how to walk: Post WWII

Percentage of Americans not meeting 30 minute a day recommendation for physical activity: 50

Percentage reduction in oil consumption in US if more trips were walked than driven: 38

Average number of steps taken during a transit trip (Montreal): 1250

Round trip: 2500

Daily recommended number of steps per day: 10,000

Hours of walking to achieve 10,000 steps: 1

Percentage of recommended daily exercise achieved by 2500 steps: 25

Average stride length: 2.5 ft (0.762m)

Average Walking Speed: 4.5km/h

Time to walk 1250 meters: 13 minutes

Transit trips requiring most steps to least steps: Train > Subway > Bus

Dollars saved from obesity-related medical costs through additional walking associated with public transit: $5500 per person

Gender that walks more on average during transit trip: Men

Gender that jaywalks more: Men

American city most dangerous for pedestrians: Orlando

Canada: Toronto

Percentage of pedestrians seriously injured by motor vehicles in UK: 21

Percentage of pedestrians seriously injured by bicycles in UK: 22

World’s worst pedestrian: Richard Ashcroft



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