23
Jan

2015

Weekly Roundup: Cheddar Gorge Update; Kuala Lumpur Restoration; Kloster’s Royal Cable Car Returns

Post by Gondola Project

Cable car at Klosters ski resort. Image via Klosters Concierge.

Cable car at Klosters ski resort. Image via Klosters Concierge.

A quick look at some of the things that happened this week in the world of urban gondolas, cable cars and cable propelled transit:

Cheddar Gorge Update (UK)
The proposal for a cable car through Cheddar Gorge in Somerset, England has been in a sort of limbo for a few years. But according to the Somerset Mercury, a financial feasibility is due to be released in February.

Rebirth of a Cable Car? (Malaysia) 
The cable car serving Bukit Nanas Forest Reserve in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was discontinued in the 1908s. Despite restoration efforts that began in 2012, it seems that Kuala Lumpur City Hall is still grappling with how to make the cable car a tourist attraction.

Re-Royaled Ski Lift (Switzerland)
Klosters ski resort in Switzerland, a longstanding favourite of the British royal family, has reinstated Prince Charles’ name on two cable cars. The label “Prince of Wales” was removed from its original place on one cable car to make room for sponsor advertising, but lobbying efforts resulted in a redoubled effort to acknowledge the future King of England.



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22
Jan

2015

Cable Car Photo of the Week: Pão de Açúcar

Post by Gondola Project

Pão de Açúcar cable car in Rio. Image by Flickr user Jon Kristian Bernhardsen. (Creative commons.)

Pão de Açúcar cable car in Rio. Image by Flickr user Jon Kristian Bernhardsen. (Creative commons.)

Photographer:
Photo by Flickr user Jon Kristian Bernhardsen.

About:
A perennial favourite of the Gondola Project, the Pão de Açúcar (or Sugarloaf) cable car in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil was included in the Daily Mail‘s 10 most breathtaking gondola rides in the world back in October. This image is a good indicator of why it made the cut.

Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

21
Jan

2015

Temporary Cable Cars: Where Are They Now?

Post by Chris Bilton

Bundesgartenschau 2005 in Munich,. Image via Wiki commons.

Bundesgartenschau 2005 in Munich. Image via Wiki commons.

One of the biggest advantages of CPT technology, is that it’s relatively easy to relocate a system, or parts of a system, to another location — sometimes for an entirely different purpose. While it’s not unheard of to see decommissioned subway cars get recycled (the TTC in Toronto recently sent some cars to Nigeria), you can effectively decommission any CPT and then relocate it anywhere in the world

Here are a couple examples of this type of relocations.

Floridaebahn in TK. Image by Flickr user Jean Jones. (Creative commons.)

Floridae Bahn in Venlo, Netherlands. Image by Flickr user Jean Jones. (Creative commons.)

Floridae Bahn (Netherlands)
Built as part of the 2012 World Horticultural Expo in Venlo, Netherlands, this 1.1 km, two station system was dismantled that same year and shipped over to Silvretta Montafon, one of the largest Austrian ski resorts.

Rostock Sielbahn, 2003. Image by Arnold Schott (Wiki commons).

Rostock Sielbahn, 2003. Image by Arnold Schott (Wiki commons).

Sielbahn Rostock/Sielbahn Munich (Germany)
Another temporary construction for a flower show, the three-station Sielbahn system transported visitors around the site of the 2003 Federal Horticultural Show in Rostock, Germany. From there, it was moved to Munich for the 2005 edition of that same event. Over the course of the 13 total months that the Sielbahn was operational in both cities, the system moved close to 2 million passengers. After Munich, the system components were dismantled and sold for use in ski lifts in the US, Austria, and elsewhere in Germany.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

20
Jan

2015

Is Your (Gondola) Project Successful?

Post by Steven Dale

Dark Tunnel
Who knows. I certainly don’t.

It’s a question we get all the time. Is such-and-such a project a success? Is it going to be a success? Why was this project a success? Why was that project a failure?

Again: Who knows. I certainly don’t.

Success is one of those awful words that sounds great but means virtually nothing.

To measure success, one first has to know the intentions and strategic goals underlying the project. That goes not just for gondolas but any project.

That may seem blatantly obvious to some, but is too often completely outside of the debate when it comes to major infrastructure projects. Too often we focus on what we are building, instead of why we are building it. 

But that’s only half the problem. Another significant obstacle is that not everyone’s strategic goals are the same. Again — totally obvious to some but all too often missing from public debate about our infrastructure needs.

What’s worse is when the intentions are unintentionally miscommunicated or — even worse again — intentionally obscured. That’s why there’s such a debate about things like London’s Emirates Air Line. Everybody seems to think they know why it shouldn’t have been built, but know one really seems to know why it actually was built.

There’s a difference there, and an important one at that.

When you know the reason something was built, it’s far easier to measure whether it was a success or a failure.

In fact, there’s no other way.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

19
Jan

2015

Cablegraph: People-Moving Comparison

Post by Gondola Project

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Like most people, we love infographics. But we really enjoy a good visual breakdown of transit capabilities, such as this collection of images from around the world. So when we came across the above graphic on Doppelmayr’s Facebook page, we thought it would be worth sharing.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

16
Jan

2015

Weekly Roundup: New York Times Hearts Squamish; Rough Guides Features Sapa; Kedarnath Ropeway Update

Post by Gondola Project

Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish, BC. Image by Flickr user Stephen Rees.

Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish, BC. Image by Flickr user Stephen Rees. (Creative commons.)

A quick look at some of the things that happened this week in the world of urban gondolas, cable cars and cable propelled transit:

If You Can Make It There… (Canada)
Squamish, B.C. made The New York Times’ list of must-visit places for 2015. Naturally, one of the main attractions highlighted by the Grey Lady is the city’s Sea to Sky gondola.

Longer! Higher! Easier! (Vietnam)
Also in tourism news, Rough Guides recently named the impending Sapa cable car to the peak of Mt. Fansipan in Vietnam’s Lao Cai Province as one of the Top 9 new tourist attractions to visit in 2015. The system, which is slated to open in September, will be the longest and highest in the world.

Ropeway Pilgrimage (India)
Despite earlier snags in the plan to link Kedarnath Temple with a last-mile ropeway, Uttarakhand Chief Minister Harish Rawat told a gathering of the Hoteliers Association that the project is a go. According to Hill Post, the 3.5 km ropeway would help provide access to the site, whose surrounding area was devastated by a flood in 2013.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

15
Jan

2015

Cable Car Photo of the Week: Shin-Kobe Ropeway

Post by Gondola Project

Shin Kobe Ropeway in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. Image by Flickr user Aapo Haapanen. (Creative commons.)

Shin Kobe Ropeway in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. Image by Flickr user Aapo Haapanen. (Creative commons.)

Photographer:
Photo by Flickr user Aapo Haapanen.

About:
Opened in 1991, this 1.5 km ropeway links downtown Kobe with the Nunobiki Herb Garden on Mount Rokkō.

Every Thursday, the Gondola Project team will select stunning captures of CPT lines. We hope this will continue to bring more attention to the technology and provide visually impactful examples of cable car systems worldwide. If you’d like to submit or nominate a picture for our “Photo of the Week”, we’d love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or send us an email at gondola@creativeurbanprojects.com.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

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