Weekly Roundup

01
Jan

2021

Weekly Roundup: It’s a bit More Complicated than ‘In with the New and Out with the Old’

Rusted remnants of the Hetauda-Kathmandu ropeway, constructed 102 years ago. A study has begun to evaluate rebuilding the ropeway.
Photo Credit: Shadow Ayush, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
  • It appears the Zagreb Cable Car inauguration will be delayed. The completion is believed to be delayed until January 3rd because a technical inspection is required to receive the permits to run the system and the holiday season caused delays. It is suspected that there are repairs that will need to be completed before opening such as reinforcing the steel roof structures. The costs for the cable car have reached 710 million kuna (approx. $115 million USD).


Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

25
Dec

2020

Weekly Roundup: Projects Progress Amid the Holidays

Long Beach, California is home to many water side attractions. A feasibility study is being conducted as to whether a cable car system would make sense for the area.


Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

18
Dec

2020

Weekly Roundup: Mountain Climbing

Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa’s tallest mountain, has been approved for a cable car system.
Photo credit: Chris 73 / Wikimedia Commons
  • Vail Resorts will debut seven new lifts across five mountains in 2021. The projects, which were initially planned for 2020, are at Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Crested Butte, Keystone, and Okemo. Okemo Mountain Resort in Vermont will have two projects, one will swap the Quantum Four for a detachable Leitner-Poma six place lift. The Quantum lift will then be used to replace the Green Ridge. The total capital cost for the seven lifts is expected to be between $125 and $130 million.


Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

11
Dec

2020

Weekly Roundup: The Age of Urban Gondolas?

Urban aerial gondolas became more popular after this one in Medellin, Colombia was completed in 2004.
  • According to an article in Axios, aerial gondolas could become common in urban areas of the United States. This technology typically seen in ski-resorts is being used successfully in Latin American cities for public transportation. Urban aerial gondolas took off after Medellin, Columbia built its first system in 2004. They are an appealing form of transit for many reasons.  During the COVID-19 era, their ability to move a small number of riders per cabin has been particularly attractive. Several cities in the U.S. are evaluating gondolas to improve transit and connectivity, like was done with the existing Roosevelt Island Tram and Portland Tram.


Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

04
Dec

2020

Weekly Roundup: Evaluations Galore

From the beach in Sidi Infi, Morocco, you can see the remnants of a historic cable car system used by Spanish Colonizers.
Photo credit: jbdodane via Flickr, license
  • Translink launched phase 2 of the Burnaby Mountain Gondola project. Phase 2 will include additional public engagement and evaluation of the three route options. From the beginning of public engagement, Translink has identified the community’s concerns, including safety and security, all-weather travel, transit connectivity, and more. Once phase 2 is complete, Translink will be submitting the final report to the Burnaby Mayor’s Council. See a related Weekly Roundup hereSCJ Alliance, the parent company of the Gondola Project, is part of this project.
  • Ruins of a 1960’s cable car show the long history of this technology. The unique sea cable car system was built in the southern end of Sidi Infi port in Africa by Spanish colonizers to transport people and goods over shallow waters, from ships to land . According to local media, the cable car was abandoned in the mid-1970’s when the Spanish colonizers left the city.


Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

20
Nov

2020

Weekly Roundup: Gondolas as Transportation, not Just Tourism

Clearwater, Florida, where a two-mile gondola system is being proposed as an improvement to the city’s transit system.


Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

13
Nov

2020

Weekly Roundup: Community Support

An aerial view of Simon Fraser University, in Burnaby, BC. Translink is conducting public engagement to decide on alignments for a gondola system that would connect the University with SkyTrain service.
Photo credit: Simon Fraser University – Communications & Marketing, CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, via Wikimedia Commons


Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.