Doppelmayr

15
Dec

2015

Ropeway Redux: Highlights From Doppelmayr’s Comprehensive Magazine

The world's safest form of public transit.

According to Doppelmayr, a ropeway with a 3,600 person capacity can use as little as 0.1kWh of power to carry one passenger over 1km — the same amount of energy consumed by a hair dryer in 5 minutes!

Earlier this year, Doppelmayr Urban Solutions produced an attractively art directed brochure-cum-magazine called Ropeways in the urban environment. It compiles the many benefits of cable cars (or ropeways as they’re called in the industry) as urban transportation.

The following is a summary of the magazine’s main points. The content is very useful for anyone looking to write a top-10 list or giving a presentation. The truly time-starved can skip to the last section for the key features at a glance.

  • Ropeways complement other forms of urban transit, easily integrating into existing infrastructure. They continuously operate, so there is no need for other modes of transit to modify their own schedules just to accommodate them.
  • Service is continuous. So the other side of the first point is no schedules for ropeway passengers to memorize and adhere to, and no long waiting periods in ropeway stations.
  • They have their own dedicated and uninterrupted route. There are no traffic jams 20 metres overhead.
  • Formerly outlying neighbourhoods thrive when connected.
  • Capacity — Ropeways can carry up to 5,000 passengers per hour and direction.
  • Capacity — Cabins can carry up to 35 passengers, plus bikes, wheelchairs, strollers and baggage. In other words, they allow barrier-free access for all riders.
  • Ropeways are statistically the world’s safest means of transit.
  • They easily integrate into neighbourhoods, requiring minimal structural footprints. (Indeed, in some cities stations have been built high up in skyscrapers.)
  • They have minimal environmental impact. The Koblenz Seilbahn, consumes as little as 0.1kwh to transport one rider over a distance of 1km. This is equivalent to the amount of energy a hair dryer uses in 5 minutes.
  • To transport 10,000 passengers in an hour, you need 100 buses, 2,000 cars or one ropeway. So, for the capacity, ropeways are a cost-effective solution for cash-strapped transit authorities and city governments.
  • Robustness — Built for mountaintop conditions, many ropeway systems can continue operating in winds up to 100km/h.
  • Comfort need never be a problem. Cabins can easily be heated, cooled and supplied with infotainment systems and Wi-Fi.
  • Ropeway infrastructure is relatively easy to build and it goes up fast — perfect for already-clogged cities with lots of construction on the go and in a hurry to get moving.
  • Stations and towers can be adapted to blend in with the local architecture.
Screen Shot 2015-12-14 at 12.58.03 PM

A gondola can offset a huge number of car and bus trips.

ROPEWAYS ARE MULTI-PURPOSE. CONSIDER THESE MANY APPLICATIONS.

  • Ropeways can fill gaps between busy zones that generate traffic, like hospitals and other outlying infrastructure.
  • They are ideal for connecting organizationally linked facilities that are physically removed, like a campus, factory or exhibition grounds.
  • You can use them to bridge otherwise difficult-to-cross barriers, inexpensively.
  • They extend or relieve existing urban transit systems, cost-effectively.
  • Ropeways generate a new source of advertising revenue. Passengers are a captive audience for the length of their ride.
Ropeways provide barrier-free access

Ropeways provide barrier-free access.

KEY FEATURES AT A GLANCE (FOR THOSE WITH NO TIME)

  • Fully automatic operation
  • High capacity due to continuous operation
  • Short, low-cost construction phase
  • Minimal space requirements
  • Easy integration with existing transport systems
  • Barrier-free movement
  • World’ssafest means of transport
  • Minimal environmental impact

 

The magazine shows examples of urban ropeways from around the world. You can downloadRopeways in the urban environment’ free.

 

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.

 



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Cable Transit Industry / Doppelmayr / Public Transit / Safety
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01
Dec

2015

What Would a Ropeway Look Like in Your Hometown? Try Doppelmayr’s Ropeway Configurator

Select, colour and reposition cabins and stations in any background.

Select, colour and reposition cabins and stations with 360-degree mobility.

Last year, Doppelmayr introduced a ropeway configurator”, which anyone can sign up for and try out. It’s a simple suite of online tools you use to visualize key elements of a virtual cable car system. The configurator’s utility is limited but it does provide a great way to begin conversations about creating real ropeways.

In other words, if you’re considering a ropeway in your city — or pitching the idea of one — Doppelmayr has provided this tool for you to compose visual guides for your next meeting and presentation. (A warning: the tool is a lot of fun to use.)

TO START, YOU CHOOSE A SINGLE SUBJECT. THEN IMAGINE.

The instruction manual calls them ‘models’. They’re the key elements, to be found in a dropdown menu from a ‘+’ symbol. Choose a chair or cabin or one of two stations, then modify your model. It’s simple to move your model 360o in any direction, plus zoom in and out.

Choose from two available backgrounds or upload your own.

Choose from two available backgrounds or upload your own.

You can also colour a number of elements of your cabin and station. With dozens of pantones to choose from, you can select the one that best matches any of your corporate colours. Speaking of which, there’s also a tool that lets you add your logo to the cabin.

NOT JUST FOR SKIING ANY MORE.

You can add any background to your project. The configurator is made by an alpine company and, understandably, both stations sit atop snowy hills. But there are two available backgrounds for all models, one of which is an overhead vista in a densely crowded city.

Best of all, you can upload your own background and fiddle with the controls to fit your cabin or station into the scene with surprising realism. The background supports JPG and even PNG files. So you can take quick screen shots from the Internet and test them for snap judgments.

Remember, any of these elements can be rotated 360 degrees and zoomed into or out of. So say you have a photograph of your city taken from the air. You can place the cabin overtop as though it were traversing local streets and you were watching it from above. You can create this picture in a couple of minutes.

IT’S EASY TO GET STARTED AND RE-STARTED.

The tools are intuitive and easy to operate.

The tools are intuitive and easy to operate.

If you’re unsure what to do at first, download this PDF of simple instructions for operation. They explain how to register and log in and how to use every available tool for a great experience. The tools also fairly common. So the processes will seem familiar and intuitive to most regular web users. The configurator allows you to store several projects on Doppelmayr’s site, so you can always return later to polish or retrieve your work. Try it now.

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Doppelmayr / Marketing Issues / New Ideas / Uncategorized
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20
Nov

2015

Urban Ropeway Highlights From the Latest WIR Magazine

Emirates Air Line, featured in the latest WIR magazine, crosses London's River Thames.

Emirates Air Line, featured in the latest WIR magazine, crosses London’s River Thames.

Recently, Doppelmayr released the 197th issue of its WIR magazine, a review of the company’s worldwide scope of business. A good deal of the content examines the phenomenon of Doppelmayr’s products as urban transport. If you don’t have the time to read the magazine just now, here are some highlights and summaries of the urban ropeway stories there. You can always read them later.

Statistics Summary of London’s Emirates Air Line

Titled “An attraction in its own right” this short section on page 4 serves up the important numbers about London’s ropeway, built for the 2012 Olympics, bridging the River Thames. Highlights include 93% customer satisfaction out of 1.8 million customers per year and a recently renewed contract with DCC UK Ltd to continue service until June 2017.

A Review of the Benefits of Urban Ropeways on Page 6

Titled “One ropeway instead of the 2,000 car journeys”, this feature article equates 2,000 cars transporting 10,000 people in an hour with 100 buses — and 1 ropeway. The ropeway, it says, offers other unique advantages though, including minimal environmental damage, virtual noiselessness, cost-effectiveness, dedicated and predictable routes that can’t be clogged, easy linking to other urban transportation, excellent safety profiles and availability. Moreover, the article says ropeways can easily blend with the environment, traversing nearly any obstacles. Finally, it talks of how they are flexible enough to accommodate bicycles and wheelchairs, with constant access and no need to consult timetables.

Working Examples of Doppelmayr Urban Ropeways

Portland Aerial Tram.

Portland Aerial Tram.

The bottom section of page 8 features the 3S lift in Koblenz, Germany, which crosses the Rhine River, and the 10-passenger gondola lifts in the cities of La Paz and El Alto in Bolivia. Extending almost 10km they form the world’s biggest urban ropeway network. Next page over in the same spot, there’s a small blurb on the environmental advantages of Marquam Hill’s aerial tramway in Portland, Oregon. (Above this section is an easy-to-follow graphic plotting the major benefits of urban ropeways.)

 

Interview with a Transport for London Senior Manager

On page 10, WIR discusses London’s Emirates Air Line, England’s first urban ropeway, with Jeremy Manning, Engineering and Assurance Manager at Transport for London. The article’s title could be the theme of the whole magazine: “A ropeway is a means of transport and an attraction.” Manning talks up the ropeway’s environmental benefits in terms of eased traffic, minimal footprint on the ground and quick construction. Despite its occasional closing, Manning quotes an impressive technical availability of 99.9%. The interview closes with praise for the tourism the ropeway draws and the unique 360-degree views it offers.

Doppelmayr Cable Car (DCC) in the Urban Environment

Finally, on page 20, WIR reviews DCC’s “specialist areas” in cities, including ropeway construction, which the article says are “awakening interest worldwide.” Using its “requisite know-how,” the company is not only building Cable Liners but also winning contracts to operate ropeways in urban surroundings, on behalf of its client cities.

You can download the magazine here.

 

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.

 



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

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06
Nov

2015

Apprenticing at Doppelmayr Part 2: A Win-Win (Everybody Gains)

The Doppelmayr apprentices' workshop in 2014

The Doppelmayr apprentices’ workshop in 2014

Recently we reported Doppelmayr’s contracts to construct new ropeways of record-breaking lengths and heights. Before that, we wrote about the company’s apprenticeship program. According to Ekkehard Assmann, Doppelmayr’s Head of Marketing and Public Relations, the two stories are more closely related than you may think. He attributes much of Doppelmayr’s recent successes and wins to the quality of all the members of its teams, and “many of our senior employees have come directly out of the apprenticeship program, starting as junior members.”

This past September, Doppelmayr announced the launch of their latest apprenticeship program with a photo of 22 young men and women. That number seemed like a lot to us. “For Doppelmayr, it’s not a lot,” he says. “We’d say it’s just about right.”

THE APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM WAS FORMALIZED IN 1979.

Doppelmayr has a long history of apprenticeship. Indeed, the company founder Konrad Doppelmayr was himself apprenticed to the town blacksmith early in his career, and the company has been formally training young people ever since.

The original workshop in 1979.

The original workshop in 1979.

However, the modern program was born in 1979 with the creation of an apprentices-only workshop. Before then, apprentices were trained on the factory floor, an arrangement which created its own set of challenges.

Just 9 new employees inaugurated that workshop, beginning their apprenticeships and careers with the company. 25 years later, that number had risen to a total 50 apprentices. Today Doppelmayr is training 92 apprentices.

TRAINING BEGINS WITH A YEAR IN THE WORKSHOP.

After extended months of gaining skills and confidence, trainees are paired with skilled workers in assorted departments. They are regularly moved around to acquire other skills and training. By their fourth year, they will have chosen a specialty.

Of course, since 1979 when the workshop was opened, advances in technology have continually changed the nature of the training within it. Consider all the almost innumerable innovations in steel construction, metal and electrical engineering, plant and industrial technology, and of course computerization.

“25 years ago, production was very conventional,” recalls Georg Dür, the head of Doppelmayr’s apprenticeship department. “With new technology the teaching job has become more sophisticated, challenging and extensive. The knowledge and skills demanded of apprentices is much greater now.”

DOPPELMAYR CALLS IT “A MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL RELATIONSHIP.”

Apprentices receive first-rate training, in strict accordance with Austria’s educational standards. Indeed, all of Doppelmayr’s electrical and metalworking instructors have qualifications from the Vorarlberg Economic Chamber and Chamber of Labor. (They also all began their careers at Doppelmayr.) Since 1997, Doppelmayr has continually been awarded “Apprentice Excellence,” a 3-year title recognizing companies in the Ausrian state of Vorarlberg with top standards in training.

The entire program is designed to educate the apprentices in the fields of mechanical and electrical engineering, but with a specialization in ropeway production. Dür says he is always looking to improve the program and maximize all the apprentices’ work experience with the company. “We take pride in helping each apprentice achieve their training goals with top marks.”

To accomplish those goals (the apprentices’ and his own) Dür inserts himself deeply into the students’ experiences. “I am the contact person for all kinds of schools, especially those providing vocational education, but also special interest groups for the local economy, like job fairs.” Reminding us how young the students, he says “I am also in contact with parents.”

Dür says apprenticing realizes a big return on investment for Doppelmayr and for himself. “Teaching keeps you on your toes. You need to remain relevant in our fast-changing world. Young people are so keen and show us a lot.” He says that teaching apprentices has helped keep him feeling younger too.

“I’m always impressed with what young people are able to achieve. They manage their schooling and private lives with family time, sports, volunteerism and the like. And they do it all with such positivity.”

 

 

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.

 

 



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Doppelmayr
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28
Oct

2015

Sea, Sand, Doppelmayr and the World’s Longest Aerial Ropeway

Grundsteinlegung-HonThom.jpg_origin

Vietnam’s Prime Minister Nguyên Tân Dung attended the launch of this record-etting project, September 4, 2015.

The Vietnamese islands of Phú Quốc and Hòn Thơm are the sort of exotically pretty holiday getaways that turn even the most mediocre of us into gifted photographers. Now, the photographs that tourists take here are about to become even more dramatic because Doppelmayr has begun building a cable car system of record-breaking length, connecting these two lovely islands.

End to end, the trip will be eight kilometers, making it the longest lift of its type in the world, plus the longest in a single section. We say ‘in a single section’ because, by design, it has to be. Connecting islands, the gondola traverses the beautiful Vietnamese Sea. Towers up to 160 meters tall are also being built on the two islands between Phú Quốc and Hòn Thơm. (That’s over half of the height of the Eiffel Tower, so imagine the views and photo opportunities.)

An extensive holidaymakers’ compound is also being constructed in the area, providing a huge array of exciting pastimes and accommodation for tourists. So the creation of this gondola made business sense.

Doppelmayr-3S-Hon-Thom-Grafik-A4-150901.jpg_origin

This new Doppelmayr 3S gondola system will stretch 8km, much of it across open sea.

DOPPELMAYR LAID THE FOUNDATION ON SEPTEMBER, 4, 2015.

Guests at the kickoff ceremony included Vietnam’s Prime Minister Nguyễn Tấn Dũng. Sun Group Corporation the project backers, commissioned Doppelmayr to build the gondola. The team expects to complete the project in about two years.

The gondola is a 3S system, technology which Doppelmayr believes is the best for the job. 3S stands for three ropes (S is for seil, the German word for rope). The system entails two fixed and fully locked track ropes that the cable car travels on, and another circulating ‘haul’ rope which is clamped to the 8-wheel cabin. It can move up to 8.5m/s.

Each cabin provides comfortable space for a capacity of 30 passengers. Doppelmayr created what it calls ‘an innovative carriage wheel generator’ to power the lighting and PA systems inside the cabins. Safety, however, remains the company’s priority. A unique recovery concept is being built into the design of this new gondola system. It ensures passenger safety in case, if for any reason, a cabin gets stranded on the line.

Doppelmayr-3S-Hon-Thom-Grafik-A4-150901.jpg_origin

This is just one of several major projects gondola systems Doppelmayr is building in Vietnam.

NOT THE FIRST RECORD-SETTING PROJECT SUN GROUP HAS AWARDED DOPPELMAYR.

Recently the two companies teamed up to create several other cable car systems including the Bana Big Ropeway, which itself set two Guinness World Records: 1) the longest gondola system of its kind in one section and 2) the system achieving the greatest vertical height.

Two other significant projects are presently underway: another 3S lift — this one will stretch over six kilometers on Vietnam’s highest mountain, Fansipan — and a reversible aerial tramway in Ha Long Bay. Both projects are coming on apace and the team at Doppelmayr expects they should be completed in the first half of next year.

So clearly the investment group believes Doppelmayr has the chops for this latest record-breaker, crossing the sea.

 

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.

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