Doppelmayr

27
Jun

2016

One Ropeway – Two World Records

Ha Long Bay Queen Cable Car breaks two records. Image by Doppelmayr.

Famous for its scenic ocean views and limestone pillars, Ha Long Bay is a world renowned UNESCO World Heritage Site in Northern Vietnam. In the past, visitors used to primarily experience the popular destination on cruise ships. But thanks to the Doppelmayr/Garaventa Group, tourists can now hop onboard a record setting aerial tram.

The 2,165m long ropeway, known as the Queen Cable Car, opened for passenger service on June 26, 2016 and was designed with two massive double-decker cabins. At a capacity of 230 persons each, these are the world’s largest ropeway cabins — holding 30 passengers more than the previous record holder in France.

If that wasn’t impressive enough, the cable lift was built with two soaring concrete towers on each side of the bay to provide passengers with sweeping aerial views. The smaller tower stands at 123.45m while the taller tower stands at 188.88m — 75m higher than the former tallest ropeway tower in Austria.

With this new cable car, the experience for Ha Long Bay’s 7 million annual tourists will never be the same. For more information, click here.

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on The Gondola Project.



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30
May

2016

Doppelmayr’s Annual Report 2016 – Another Year of Innovations and Records

Last month, Doppelmayr-Garaventa released its highly anticipated Annual Worldwide 2016 Report. Each year, the world’s largest ropeway manufacturer produces this impressive publication which documents the many incredible rope-driven installations built in the previous year.

Doppelmayr Annual Report 2016

Doppelmayr Annual Report 2016. Images from Doppelmayr.

The 158-page book is chock full of stunning photos and jaw-dropping facts for all 103 installations built in 2015. This makes the highly visual guide a light-hearted read for audiences of all backgrounds and ages.

While every year Doppelmayr continues to be at the forefront of ropeway innovation, the spectacular variety seen in the 2016 version is particularly memorable. As the technology continues to build its profile in cities, a few new ropeway systems may have key implications for urban settings.


30-TDG Fansipan Legend 

The Fansipan Legend in Northern Vietnam sets the world record for 3S/tricable detachable gondolas with the greatest elevation change (vertical rise) at 1251m. It provides visitors of all mobility levels the chance to experience the roof of Indochina. As 3S technology continues to mature and develop, it paves the way for even more impressive installations and opportunities in cities.

30-TDG Penkenbahn 

Penkenbahn 1

The brand new 3S Penkenbahn in Austria’s Mayrhofner Bergbahnen makes a 6.5 degree turn only on towers. Passengers are whisked up the side of Penken mountain in spacious cabins where they have access to ski and hiking terrain. The ability to make turns on towers without a mid-station means greater flexibility for cable cars to navigate complex urban built-form. This engineering marvel is unprecedented and showcases Doppelmayr’s committed to innovation.


6/8-CDG Riederalp–Blausee / 6/8-CDG Blausee–Moosfluh

6:8-CGD Riederalp–Blausee -- 6:8-CGD Blausee–Moosfluh (Realign)

The Riederalp-Blausse-Moosfluh combined lift in Switzerland is designed with the capability to realign stations and towers in both a vertical and horizontal direction. This unique design was necessary to accommodate shifting geological conditions as engineers predict that the glacier will move between 5-11m in the next 25 years. This system demonstrates the remarkable ingenuity of Doppelmayr’s designers to build cable lifts in the face of almost insurmountable odds.

10-MDG Kirchenkarbahn

10-MGD Kirchenkarbahn

Austria’s Kirchenkarbahn in Obergurgl-Hochgurgl becomes the first cable car built with Doppelmayr’s next-generation D-Line technology. Of the many new benefits, this innovative system offers lower noise levels, and greater maintenance friendliness. As urban systems place higher performance demands and requirements, the D-Line helps Doppelmayr cement its position as the world leader in ropeways.

 

Summary

Doppelmayr Annual Report 2016 (2)

Of course Doppelmayr’s installations span beyond the systems we’ve mentioned above and every system has its own special and unique story to tell.

For a full look at the company’s accomplishments, be sure to download and share a copy of their report. Click here.



Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on The Gondola Project.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

12
Apr

2016

Doppelmayr’s Innovative Recovery Concept – Unmatched Passenger Safety and Comfort

As we’ve pointed out before, gondolas are the safest form of transport in the world. Whether it’s data from United States, France or the Swiss Alps, cable cars have demonstrated their ability to transport riders in the most extreme topographical and meteorological conditions with unmatched safety and comfort.

Despite its high safety record, Doppelmayr – the global leader in urban gondolas with worldwide facilities and sales teams – has continued to advance and improve the technology to greater levels of quality and excellence.

In recent times, the company has designed an innovative safety feature called the Recovery Concept.

Koblenz Cable Car is equipped with the Recovery Concept to maximize safety.

The Recovery Concept is a series of redundant drive-line systems that ensures the cabins will return to a station in the event of a mechanical or electrical failure of the primary drive-line.

While there have always been backup drive-lines for aerial ropeway installations, the world’s first detachable gondola supported by the Recovery Concept was installed in the Grasjochbahn 8-passenger gondola (Silvretta Montafon, Voralberg, Austria) in 2011.

Grasjoch 8-passenger gondola. Image by Doppelmayr.

Grasjoch 8-passenger gondola. Image by Doppelmayr.

“With Doppelmayr’s Recovery Concept, dramatic and expensive rescues are no longer necessary. Cabins with passengers remain comfortably intact and would simply be returned to the station with one of the Concept’s alternative drive mechanisms,” says Tom Sanford, VP Sales of Doppelmayr USA.

Doppelmayr Recovery Concept. Image by Doppelmayr.

Recovery Concept. Image by Doppelmayr.

Major features of this system include:

  • Main drive mechanism has an auxiliary motor in case of primary motor failure
  • Coupling can be detached from bullwheel to allow emergency drives to take over in case both primary and auxiliary motors fail
  • Each bullwheel is equipped with an emergency bearing allowing rotational movement between emergency drives on either side
  • Special tools installed which lifts the cable back to normal position in case of derailment
  • Special tools, such as permanent crane facilities, to remove blocked cabins

“We’ll never completely eliminate the need for rope rescues but, with Doppelmayr’s Recovery Concept, nearly all of them are now prevented,” says Sanford.

 

Application to Urban Gondolas

Already the Recovery Concept has been installed in several high-profile urban cable cars including the Koblenz Cable Car (Germany), and the Emirates Air Line Cable Car (UK).

Emirates Air Line Cable Car built with the Recovery Concept. Two independent emergency drives and recovery equipment on top of each tower means passengers can stay in cabins during emergencies.

“We think this concept is a must-have for cities installing ropeways as public transportation” says Sanford.

As the performance and passenger requirements of public transit is immensely demanding, the Recovery Concept can help strengthen Cable Propelled Transit’s position as the world’s safest urban transport modality.

You can learn more about Doppelmayr and urban applications of its ropeways here.

 

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Doppelmayr / Engineering
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22
Mar

2016

Next-Gen Ropeway Designs: D-Line by Doppelmayr

D-Line Station. Screenshot from Doppelmayr Video.

D-Line Station. Screenshot from Doppelmayr video.

This week Doppelmayr released footage of its next generation ropeway system for detachable lifts, the D-Line. Alongside Youtube videos of the terminal design, the manufacturer also showcased its new cabins and grips.


Among a slew of new features in the remodeled stations, a few will be be particularly attractive in city environments:

  • Real glass design
  • Low noise bullwheel design
  • Silenced running rail and outer guide rail
  • Low noise grip opening/closing rail
  • Station roof covers entire carrier
  • Outer facade for displaying media content

In terms of the D-Line carriers, the Omega IV-10 SI D provides added passenger comfort as the cabins are now larger than before.

Meanwhile, the Detachable Grip D promises to increase service life and enable greater ease of maintenance. The design has been optimized to accommodate ropes of up to 64mm in diameter and allow up to 1,800kg (4,000lbs) in total carrier weight.


 



These features, especially noise reduction, ease of maintenance and larger cabins, will be especially important in the urban market. Further innovations are likely to take place in the future as urban ropeways continue to place greater demands on the technology.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Doppelmayr / Engineering / Infrastructure / Innovations / Stations
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15
Dec

2015

Ropeway Redux: Highlights From Doppelmayr’s Comprehensive Magazine

The world's safest form of public transit.

According to Doppelmayr, a ropeway with a 3,600 person capacity can use as little as 0.1kWh of power to carry one passenger over 1km — the same amount of energy consumed by a hair dryer in 5 minutes!

Earlier this year, Doppelmayr Urban Solutions produced an attractively art directed brochure-cum-magazine called Ropeways in the urban environment. It compiles the many benefits of cable cars (or ropeways as they’re called in the industry) as urban transportation.

The following is a summary of the magazine’s main points. The content is very useful for anyone looking to write a top-10 list or giving a presentation. The truly time-starved can skip to the last section for the key features at a glance.

  • Ropeways complement other forms of urban transit, easily integrating into existing infrastructure. They continuously operate, so there is no need for other modes of transit to modify their own schedules just to accommodate them.
  • Service is continuous. So the other side of the first point is no schedules for ropeway passengers to memorize and adhere to, and no long waiting periods in ropeway stations.
  • They have their own dedicated and uninterrupted route. There are no traffic jams 20 metres overhead.
  • Formerly outlying neighbourhoods thrive when connected.
  • Capacity — Ropeways can carry up to 5,000 passengers per hour and direction.
  • Capacity — Cabins can carry up to 35 passengers, plus bikes, wheelchairs, strollers and baggage. In other words, they allow barrier-free access for all riders.
  • Ropeways are statistically the world’s safest means of transit.
  • They easily integrate into neighbourhoods, requiring minimal structural footprints. (Indeed, in some cities stations have been built high up in skyscrapers.)
  • They have minimal environmental impact. The Koblenz Seilbahn, consumes as little as 0.1kwh to transport one rider over a distance of 1km. This is equivalent to the amount of energy a hair dryer uses in 5 minutes.
  • To transport 10,000 passengers in an hour, you need 100 buses, 2,000 cars or one ropeway. So, for the capacity, ropeways are a cost-effective solution for cash-strapped transit authorities and city governments.
  • Robustness — Built for mountaintop conditions, many ropeway systems can continue operating in winds up to 100km/h.
  • Comfort need never be a problem. Cabins can easily be heated, cooled and supplied with infotainment systems and Wi-Fi.
  • Ropeway infrastructure is relatively easy to build and it goes up fast — perfect for already-clogged cities with lots of construction on the go and in a hurry to get moving.
  • Stations and towers can be adapted to blend in with the local architecture.
Screen Shot 2015-12-14 at 12.58.03 PM

A gondola can offset a huge number of car and bus trips.

ROPEWAYS ARE MULTI-PURPOSE. CONSIDER THESE MANY APPLICATIONS.

  • Ropeways can fill gaps between busy zones that generate traffic, like hospitals and other outlying infrastructure.
  • They are ideal for connecting organizationally linked facilities that are physically removed, like a campus, factory or exhibition grounds.
  • You can use them to bridge otherwise difficult-to-cross barriers, inexpensively.
  • They extend or relieve existing urban transit systems, cost-effectively.
  • Ropeways generate a new source of advertising revenue. Passengers are a captive audience for the length of their ride.
Ropeways provide barrier-free access

Ropeways provide barrier-free access.

KEY FEATURES AT A GLANCE (FOR THOSE WITH NO TIME)

  • Fully automatic operation
  • High capacity due to continuous operation
  • Short, low-cost construction phase
  • Minimal space requirements
  • Easy integration with existing transport systems
  • Barrier-free movement
  • World’ssafest means of transport
  • Minimal environmental impact

 

The magazine shows examples of urban ropeways from around the world. You can downloadRopeways in the urban environment’ free.

 

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.

 



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Cable Transit Industry / Doppelmayr / Public Transit / Safety
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01
Dec

2015

What Would a Ropeway Look Like in Your Hometown? Try Doppelmayr’s Ropeway Configurator

Select, colour and reposition cabins and stations in any background.

Select, colour and reposition cabins and stations with 360-degree mobility.

Last year, Doppelmayr introduced a ropeway configurator”, which anyone can sign up for and try out. It’s a simple suite of online tools you use to visualize key elements of a virtual cable car system. The configurator’s utility is limited but it does provide a great way to begin conversations about creating real ropeways.

In other words, if you’re considering a ropeway in your city — or pitching the idea of one — Doppelmayr has provided this tool for you to compose visual guides for your next meeting and presentation. (A warning: the tool is a lot of fun to use.)

TO START, YOU CHOOSE A SINGLE SUBJECT. THEN IMAGINE.

The instruction manual calls them ‘models’. They’re the key elements, to be found in a dropdown menu from a ‘+’ symbol. Choose a chair or cabin or one of two stations, then modify your model. It’s simple to move your model 360o in any direction, plus zoom in and out.

Choose from two available backgrounds or upload your own.

Choose from two available backgrounds or upload your own.

You can also colour a number of elements of your cabin and station. With dozens of pantones to choose from, you can select the one that best matches any of your corporate colours. Speaking of which, there’s also a tool that lets you add your logo to the cabin.

NOT JUST FOR SKIING ANY MORE.

You can add any background to your project. The configurator is made by an alpine company and, understandably, both stations sit atop snowy hills. But there are two available backgrounds for all models, one of which is an overhead vista in a densely crowded city.

Best of all, you can upload your own background and fiddle with the controls to fit your cabin or station into the scene with surprising realism. The background supports JPG and even PNG files. So you can take quick screen shots from the Internet and test them for snap judgments.

Remember, any of these elements can be rotated 360 degrees and zoomed into or out of. So say you have a photograph of your city taken from the air. You can place the cabin overtop as though it were traversing local streets and you were watching it from above. You can create this picture in a couple of minutes.

IT’S EASY TO GET STARTED AND RE-STARTED.

The tools are intuitive and easy to operate.

The tools are intuitive and easy to operate.

If you’re unsure what to do at first, download this PDF of simple instructions for operation. They explain how to register and log in and how to use every available tool for a great experience. The tools also fairly common. So the processes will seem familiar and intuitive to most regular web users. The configurator allows you to store several projects on Doppelmayr’s site, so you can always return later to polish or retrieve your work. Try it now.

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Doppelmayr / Marketing Issues / New Ideas / Uncategorized
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20
Nov

2015

Urban Ropeway Highlights From the Latest WIR Magazine

Emirates Air Line, featured in the latest WIR magazine, crosses London's River Thames.

Emirates Air Line, featured in the latest WIR magazine, crosses London’s River Thames.

Recently, Doppelmayr released the 197th issue of its WIR magazine, a review of the company’s worldwide scope of business. A good deal of the content examines the phenomenon of Doppelmayr’s products as urban transport. If you don’t have the time to read the magazine just now, here are some highlights and summaries of the urban ropeway stories there. You can always read them later.

Statistics Summary of London’s Emirates Air Line

Titled “An attraction in its own right” this short section on page 4 serves up the important numbers about London’s ropeway, built for the 2012 Olympics, bridging the River Thames. Highlights include 93% customer satisfaction out of 1.8 million customers per year and a recently renewed contract with DCC UK Ltd to continue service until June 2017.

A Review of the Benefits of Urban Ropeways on Page 6

Titled “One ropeway instead of the 2,000 car journeys”, this feature article equates 2,000 cars transporting 10,000 people in an hour with 100 buses — and 1 ropeway. The ropeway, it says, offers other unique advantages though, including minimal environmental damage, virtual noiselessness, cost-effectiveness, dedicated and predictable routes that can’t be clogged, easy linking to other urban transportation, excellent safety profiles and availability. Moreover, the article says ropeways can easily blend with the environment, traversing nearly any obstacles. Finally, it talks of how they are flexible enough to accommodate bicycles and wheelchairs, with constant access and no need to consult timetables.

Working Examples of Doppelmayr Urban Ropeways

Portland Aerial Tram.

Portland Aerial Tram.

The bottom section of page 8 features the 3S lift in Koblenz, Germany, which crosses the Rhine River, and the 10-passenger gondola lifts in the cities of La Paz and El Alto in Bolivia. Extending almost 10km they form the world’s biggest urban ropeway network. Next page over in the same spot, there’s a small blurb on the environmental advantages of Marquam Hill’s aerial tramway in Portland, Oregon. (Above this section is an easy-to-follow graphic plotting the major benefits of urban ropeways.)

 

Interview with a Transport for London Senior Manager

On page 10, WIR discusses London’s Emirates Air Line, England’s first urban ropeway, with Jeremy Manning, Engineering and Assurance Manager at Transport for London. The article’s title could be the theme of the whole magazine: “A ropeway is a means of transport and an attraction.” Manning talks up the ropeway’s environmental benefits in terms of eased traffic, minimal footprint on the ground and quick construction. Despite its occasional closing, Manning quotes an impressive technical availability of 99.9%. The interview closes with praise for the tourism the ropeway draws and the unique 360-degree views it offers.

Doppelmayr Cable Car (DCC) in the Urban Environment

Finally, on page 20, WIR reviews DCC’s “specialist areas” in cities, including ropeway construction, which the article says are “awakening interest worldwide.” Using its “requisite know-how,” the company is not only building Cable Liners but also winning contracts to operate ropeways in urban surroundings, on behalf of its client cities.

You can download the magazine here.

 

Materials on this page are paid for. Gondola Project (including its parent companies and its team of writers and contributors) does not explicitly or implicitly endorse third parties in exchange for advertising. Advertising does not influence editorial content, products, or services offered on Gondola Project.

 



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

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