25
Sep

2011

Sunday Statshot with Nick Chu: Zeppelins and Airships

Post by Gondola Project

 

An artist's rendition - dated 1910 - of modern travel by year 2000. The past is so much more awesome than the present. Image by www.airships.net.

A quick, fun look at the history of Zeppelin travel and its (im)possibility for future applications:

Year which Zeppelin idea first materialized: 1874

Year which Wright Brothers first took flight in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina: 1903

Speed of initial Zeppelins: 21km/h

Zeppelin length: 126m

Bus length: 12m

First successful Zeppelin: LZ3

Total kilometres travelled: 4398

First revenue airline service in the world: German Airship Travel Corporation (aka DELAG)

First regular transatlantic airship line: 1930

Travel package offered: Frankfurt, Germany to Recife, Brazil

Total travel time: 68 hours (~3 days)

Zeppelin nickname during WWI: Baby Killer

Killer dish inspired by Zeppelins: Cepelinai (Lithuania’s national dish)

Modern airship technology: Zeppelin NT

Maximum Speed: 125km/h

Popular lifting gas in early Zeppelins: Hydrogen

Result: Hindenburg Disaster

Safer alternative gas used in present day applications: Helium

Cost to fill up Zeppelin: $1.5 million USD

Percentage of world helium supplied and controlled by US: 80

Number of years before US helium stockpile is exhausted: 4

Future cost of inflating a party balloon: $100

Balloon volume: 4 cubic feet

Zeppelin volume: 300,000 cubic feet

Projected future cost of filling up Zeppelin: $7 million



Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Want more? Purchase Cable Car Confidential: The Essential Guide to Cable Cars, Urban Gondolas & Cable Propelled Transit and start learning about the world's fastest growing transportation technologies.

Sunday Statshot
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