24
Nov

2009

LT1M Wait Times

Post by Steven Dale

Less-Than-One-Minute (LT1M) wait times should be the goal of every transit planner because it is a principle that focuses on the user rather than the operator.

What the user wants is simple:  to be able to travel whenever they want regardless of schedule.

Imagine . . .

. . . if your front door only opened for 30 seconds every 15 minutes . . .

. . . or what if the opportunity to start your car’s engine only occurred once in every 10 minutes but always at a different point during those ten minutes . . .

. . . or how about never having a pair of shoes when you desperately need go outside only to find 4 pairs lined up in a row when you decide to stay indoors.

You’d lose your mind, you know you would.  And yet, that’s what we live with given our current transit systems.  It’s a testament to the resiliency of humanity that we still really want to make public transit work, but resiliency only lasts so long.

That’s why public transit so often loses the battle to bikes, feet and cars.  People like the convenience of being able to depart at their convenience not the convenience of their scheduled service provider.

Schedule service, when you think about it, is not really service at all . . . except for those administering and operating it.

Demand LT1M.



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Analysis / Thoughts / Urban Planning & Design
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